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Balloon Exhibits

Creating a large-scale exhibit requires a passion for the art of twisting balloons.  A typical exhibit takes months of planning and preparation, a team of support staff, a crew of skilled and dedicated artists, an accommodating host location with sufficient space, and generous sponsors to provide the essential equipment and - of course - balloons!  Once all the logistics are in place, the heavy work (and sleepless nights) begin... usually just a few days before the scheduled opening of the exhibit.  This is the inherent nature of working with balloons - there are time constraints both in how early one can start the creative process and how long the results last once the exhibit opens.

Exhibits are a great way to attract public attention to your cause.  Balloons add movement and color, and the exhibits we create stretch the imagination of attendees.  Ed typically creates exhibits for worthy causes.  If you are considering a unique exhibit for your special event, contact Ed for details.

 

Exhibits

2004 Balloon Manor
2006 Balloon Manor
2008 JAPAN Hanakeshiki Project

2004 Balloon Manor

Balloon Manor in Rochester, NY.

2006 Balloon Manor

Balloon Manor in Rochester, NY.

2008 JAPAN Hanakeshiki Project

Hanakeshiki Project, Chiba,  JAPAN

February, 2008

 Hanakeshiki is a non-profit organization that works with handicapped individuals in Japan.  The organization runs annual projects where handicapped individuals can participate in various roles and be productive.  Their results are usually shared with the general public, showing that they can be productive members of Japanese society.  By participating, handicapped individuals also develop a sense of self-worth as their spirits are uplifted. 

One of the directors of Hanakeshiki, Ms. Yumiko Ishikawa, was instrumental in drafting the vision of using a balloon exhibit as a project.  Under her dedicated guidance, this project became reality as she secured the location and funding for the project.

Ed Chee created the overall project design, with Rie Hosokai providing design support.  The 2,000 sq.ft. exibit consisted of 5 rooms defined by balloon wall murals and was held at the Chiba Museum in Chiba, Japan.  Each room had a lead designer; Ed Chee,  Rie Hosokai, Tomo, Rio, and Balloon Oyaji.  Many Japanese balloon artists, both decorators and twisters, travelled from across Japan to participate in the project.  Handicapped individuals provided additional support by preparing marketing materials and providing assistance during the exhibit construction.  Following 3 days of construction, the exhibit was opened to the public and covered by the Japanese media.  Approximately 2500 individuals visited the exhibit over a 3-day period.

 The design of the project was a multi-layered theme; it used a combination of the hanamatsuri (girls festival), a progression of seasons, and "growing up" as a theme.  The corner room progressed through the flowers of the seasons; Plum, Peach, Cherry, and Iris.  In the center room was the Hanamatsuri dolls exhibit created with balloons.  As visitors progressed through each room, the characters progressed in age from infancy to school age.

Visitors to the exhibit were given information on Hanakeshiki and the handicapped in addition to enjoying the unique experience of walk through a life-size exhibit created entirely out of balloons.  Each room provided photo opportunities. In the Hanamatsuri room, they were given the opportunity to wear a balloon costume and "become" dolls.

 Finally, in the Iris room visitors were invited to try their hands at twisting a balloon flower and attaching it to a balloon tree.  The tree, barren at the start of the exhibit, was completely covered with balloon blossoms by the end of the exhibit.